[ad_1]

David Carrick sentenced to more than 30 years in prison

The serial rapist and former Metropolitan police officer David Carrick has been sentenced to more than 30 years in prison.

He pleaded guilty to 49 charges against 12 women between 2003 and 2020, with some of the charges detailing multiple offences. Sentencing him at Southwark crown court this afternoon, Mrs Justice Cheema Grubb told Carrick he would serve a total of 36 life sentences, with 30 years and 239 days to be served before the parole board can consider releasing him.

Key events

Farah Nazeer, the chief executive of Women’s Aid, has told the BBC that, while the sentence is an “acceptable sentence in a very, very unacceptable situation”, it comes “17 years, 12 victims and at least and 85 offences too late”.

The broadcaster reports that Nazeer praised Carrick’s victims and said today’s sentencing was only possible due to the “courage, commitment and determination of those women who went up against an agent of the law”.

It is very hard to do that, even when you’re not up against a police officer. The courage and bravery should be commended and that will send a message to other women in that situation that justice can be achieved.

Here’s some more detail on the sentencing remarks from Mrs Justice Cheema-Grubb, who told Carrick earlier today (see 12.09pm):

I have read the statements made by 10 of the 12 victims, both as to their experiences and the impact it has had. There is powerful and compelling evidence of irretrievable devastation in the lives of those you abused.

Survivors of rape and coercive control react and cope in different ways. Those differences are apparent in the statements. Each one is traumatised. One woman feels as if she has been lost for the last 19 years, encapsulating her experience with you as an encounter with evil which has caused long-lasting psychological harm.

Denial, anger, hatred, betrayal, shame, self-blame and fear of being labelled a victim, are common emotions. You have shaped their lives, deprived them of the ability to trust men and form relationships.

Some have damaged mental health and suffer loneliness. They continue to question their own judgment. They don’t trust the police. Some have tried to get back control by behaving in dangerous ways; self-harming, interfering with their own health and relationships, pushing boundaries and almost destroying trust in those they value the most.

Those you controlled are trying to recover their self-esteem and lost relationships; including with a daughter who self-harms and still has nightmares because of your abuse of her mother.

These women are not weak or ineffectual. They were victims of your criminal mindset. The malign influence of men like you in positions of power stands in the way of a revolution of women’s dignity.

It is remarkable that, with one woman being driven to report an allegation against you despite your position and power, others felt able to act. Even today, courage calls to courage everywhere and its voice cannot be denied.

The home secretary Suella Braverman has described Carrick’s crimes as a “scar on our police”. She adds:

It is only right that he now faces at least 30 years behind bars. I pay tribute to the brave women who have come forward to hold him to account for his vile abuse.

It is vital we uncover how he was able to wear the uniform for so long, and I welcome the Angiolini inquiry’s investigation into David Carrick’s criminal behaviour and the decision-making around his vetting.

There is no place in our police for such heinous and predatory behaviour, and I look forward to receiving Lady Elish’s findings.

Carrick’s crimes were all carried out while he was a serving police officer. He passed vetting checks to guard sites including embassies and the Houses of Parliament and completed training courses, including one on domestic abuse in 2005.

The Met was forced to apologise and admit Carrick should have been rooted out earlier after it emerged he came to police attention over nine separate incidents between 2000 and 2021 – and was known to colleagues as “Bastard Dave”.

They included allegations of rape, domestic violence and harassment with all but one of the incidents relating to his behaviour towards women.

Carrick faced no criminal sanctions or misconduct findings and police chiefs across England and Wales have since been asked to have all officers checked against national police databases by the end of March.

He was finally sacked from the force last month after his final guilty pleas and his crimes are set to form part of the independent inquiry looking at the murder of Sarah Everard, who was raped and strangled by then-serving Met officer Wayne Couzens in March 2021.

The case is the latest in a string of damaging scandals for the Met, including Everard’s murder, racist and misogynist messages exchanged by a team at Charing Cross, and the strip-search of a teenage girl at school while she was menstruating.

Carrick sat in the dock with his eyes closed and head bowed during the hearing in a packed courtroom, including some of his victims, and showed no emotion as he was sentenced.

Peter Burt, the head of the Crown Prosecution Service complex casework unit in Thames and Chiltern, said:

We’ve heard the accounts of the women who suffered at Carrick’s hands. We cannot undo the pain they have endured, but we hope this can be a first step to rebuilding their lives knowing he can’t harm them – or any other woman – again.

The shadow home secretary, Yvette Cooper, has said:

David Carrick should never have been allowed to become a police officer or stay in policing for so long. His crimes are devastating, and our thoughts will be with his victims and their families today.

A major overhaul of police standards is desperately needed but there has been a serious failure by Conservative ministers to take action. After Sarah Everard’s murder, we were promised change. But there are still no compulsory vetting requirements and progress on driving up standards has been far too slow, letting down the victims and police officers who work so hard to keep communities safe.

Labour will not sit back and leave the work to police forces. The next Labour government will change the law to make national rules on police vetting, misconduct and training mandatory for every police force. That will include an automatic suspension when allegations of serious crimes like rape and domestic abuse are made.

We owe it to the victims in this hideous case to take the strongest action on police standards and that’s what Labour will deliver.

Sadiq Khan, whose role as mayor of London gives him oversight of the Met, has said:

My thoughts are with Carrick’s victims today. I want to pay tribute to their bravery and courage. By coming forward they have helped to protect the public and rid the Met police of a dangerous and prolific offender who abused his position as a police officer in the worst possible way.

This should never have been allowed to happen and must never happen again. There can be no hiding place for those who abuse their position of trust and authority within the police. I want to reassure the public and all the brave officers and staff who want to speak out that under the new commissioner any allegation of misconduct will be taken seriously and handled sensitively. I urge people to come forward to report any unacceptable behaviour.

I support the renewed action being taken by the commissioner Sir Mark Rowley to review past misconduct cases and I welcome the widening of the Angiolini inquiry to consider Carrick’s crimes and look at vetting and recruitment procedures and the extent of misogynistic culture in policing.

I’ll continue to support and hold the Met to account to ensure we root out all those who are unfit to serve as police officers and deliver the urgent reforms and step change in culture and performance required. As mayor, I will not be satisfied until Londoners have the police service they deserve.

For clarity, Carrick’s minimum term was set as 32 years. He has already served some time in custody and this is removed from the sentence to be served.

In their statements, his victims spoke of how they had “encountered evil”, and the court was told Carrick sent one of his victims a photograph of himself with a work-issue gun, saying: “Remember I am the boss.”

The court also heard how he told another woman he was the “safest person that she could be with and that he was a police officer” before taking her back to his nearby flat to rape her.

The sexual predator previously admitted 49 charges, including 24 counts of rape and charges of sexual assault, controlling and coercive behaviour and false imprisonment.

The judge listed the sentences being passed, telling Carrick he would serve concurrent sentences of four, seven and nine years for a series of counts against him. In total, she told him he was being given 36 sentences of life imprisonment, with the determinate sentence set as the minimum he must serve before being eligible for release by the Parole Board.

She declined to impose a whole-life order, saying the threshold had not been met.

David Carrick sentenced to more than 30 years in prison

The serial rapist and former Metropolitan police officer David Carrick has been sentenced to more than 30 years in prison.

He pleaded guilty to 49 charges against 12 women between 2003 and 2020, with some of the charges detailing multiple offences. Sentencing him at Southwark crown court this afternoon, Mrs Justice Cheema Grubb told Carrick he would serve a total of 36 life sentences, with 30 years and 239 days to be served before the parole board can consider releasing him.

The judge orders Carrick to stand.

Mrs Justice Cheema-Grubb tells Carrick he used his position to carry out his offences and that this risk will last indefinitely. This is significant because it will substantially influence the sentence she eventually passes.

She says she will allow a 20% guilty plea reduction. She says his attempt at suicide was more out of self-pity than remorse.

The judge says it will count in his favour when sentence is passed that Carrick was moved from prison to hospital because it was feared he was suffering from depression and tried to kill himself.

The judge is detailing the pre-sentence report, which says Carrick was the victim of child abuse; something she says he deserved to be protected from. But she says that, while he abused alcohol as an adult, he was careful not to do so while at work – meaning he was capable of controlling and moderating his behaviour when he wanted to.

The judge says Carrick initially pleaded not guilty, but later changed those pleas. Beyond those admissions of guilt, however, she says he has not expressed remorse.

The judge says:

There is powerful and compelling evidence of irretrievable devastation in the lives of those you have abused.

She says survivors of such attacks react in different ways, but adds that he has taken away the trust some have in the police, in men generally. He says those Carrick controlled have lost their self-esteem and relationships with family members.

The judge details another account that makes clear Carrick used the immigration status of a woman to force her to submit to his violent sexual attacks, telling her he would report her if she complained.

[ad_2]

https://i.guim.co.uk/img/media/a283e1364fd83b43f3f2e3f9499f419c32c99963/0_232_3500_2101/master/3500.jpg?width=1200&height=630&quality=85&auto=format&fit=crop&overlay-align=bottom%2Cleft&overlay-width=100p&overlay-base64=L2ltZy9zdGF0aWMvb3ZlcmxheXMvdGctbGl2ZS5wbmc&enable=upscale&s=add80d85b1ef00d74b90c8de511a0191

#David #Carrick #serial #rapist #Met #police #officer #sentenced #years #prison #live #updates

Previous post Mark Cavendish robbery: Two men jailed for raid at cyclist’s home
Next post Farzi co-director opens up about Bollywood actors being frequently portrayed as antagonists in South Indian films; says, “All our actors here have gone there and played bad guys including Manoj Bajpayee” : Bollywood News – Bollywood Hungama