Read Time:3 Minute, 26 Second

While the cost of fuel might have decreased since prices soared recently, filling your car up still means regular spending.

Whether you drive a short distance for the commute to work or you’re someone who drives for longer periods of time, you might be wondering how you can make a tank of fuel last longer.

Insurance experts A-Plan Insurance have rounded up 10 tips to help drivers improve their car’s fuel efficiency, let’s take a look.

10 tips on how to make your car’s fuel last longer

Watch your speed

The RAC says driving at 45-50mph is the most efficient speed for fuel consumption, A-Plan Insurance said.

Driving at 70mph uses up to 9% more fuel than at 60mph and up to 15% more than at 50mph. Driving at 80mph can use up to 25% more fuel than at 70mph, according to the Department for Transport. Motorway drivers should use cruise control if they have it.

Oxford Mail:

Watch your gears

Drivers who want to save fuel should change up and down multiple gears at a time and change to the highest suitable gear as soon as they can to avoid over-revving.

The AA advises drivers to avoid coasting where you engage ‘neutral’ or drive with the clutch down, deeming it unsafe and unlikely to save any fuel.

Accelerate and brake gently

To save on fuel, drivers could adopt a smooth driving technique.

For example, if you’re approaching red traffic lights you could slow down early so they might have changed by the time you reach them, meaning you might not have to come to a stop at all.

A-Plan Insurance adds that drivers should anticipate the road ahead and ease off the throttle and maintain momentum rather than braking hard and then accelerating again if they want to make their fuel last longer.

Remove weight and reduce drag

If you have items in your boot or a bike or roof rack on your car that you don’t need, you could remove these to avoid the drag from carrying the heavier items decreasing your fuel efficiency.

A heavier car will need more fuel to keep it moving.

Use aircon less often

According to the AA, using aircon can increase fuel consumption by about 10%.

If you need to cool down, opening your windows or lowering your soft top is the cheaper option.

Maintain your tyres

Tyre pressures should be checked at least once a month and tyres that are under-inflated burn more fuel.

Tyres that are eight pounds under inflated have a rolling resistance that increases by 5%.

Oxford Mail:

Have your car serviced regularly

Replacing oil, air and fuel filters at the recommended intervals can help you reduce your car’s fuel consumption.

Avoid short trips

If you are taking short trips, it’s even more important to make sure your aircon is turned off because it will use most of its energy for the initial cool-down.

Avoid travel hotspots

Sitting in traffic jams with your engine on can consume around 0.6 litres of fuel per hour.

Cars that have a stop/start engine are recommended for drivers who frequently find themselves stuck in traffic jams.

Check Google Maps before you set off on your journey as this can notify you of the routes that are congested and even suggest an alternative to keep you moving.

Upgrade your car

While many will not be in a position to upgrade their car right now, those who can invest in a newer car, not necessarily brand new, will benefit from saving money on fuel and could even reduce their road tax.

If you’re looking for a replacement vehicle but not ready to make the jump to an electric car, diesel generally provides better fuel economy than petrol equivalents.

A-Plan Insurance also explains that while it isn’t able to help drivers reduce the cost of fuel, drivers can reduce their mileage to help reduce car insurance premiums.




https://www.oxfordmail.co.uk/resources/images/16252874/?type=og-image

#top #tips #cars #fuel #longer

Happy
Happy
0 %
Sad
Sad
0 %
Excited
Excited
0 %
Sleepy
Sleepy
0 %
Angry
Angry
0 %
Surprise
Surprise
0 %
Previous post How to watch Accused 2023 online: stream the Fox crime drama series from anywhere
Next post Energy firms face investigation over prepayment meters by regulator