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Whiskey fungus — sometimes called distillery fungus, rum fungus or warehouse-staining fungus — is a black fungus with the scientific name Baudoinia compniacensis. Though the fungus is literally black in color, it is not the same as black moldStachybotrys, which can cause significant health issues and infrastructure damage. 

Here’s what happens: After whiskey is distilled it is held in barrels in a warehouse during its aging process. The length of distillation time varies but during the process, an estimated 2 to 5 percent of the alcohol evaporates. Depending on the amount of alcohol being processed, that can add up to as much as 200 to 1,000 tons (181 to 907 metric tons) of ethanol emissions each year. 

The emissions are poetically referred to as the “angel’s share” but there’s evidence to suggest the vapors don’t quite make it to heaven. When the ethanol combines with moisture in the air, the result is a type of fungus that feeds on the sugar in ethanol — whiskey fungus. Like any other fungus, it attaches itself to just about anything including buildings, trees, cars and outdoor furnishings. 


#Whiskey #Fungus #Dangerous

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