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Summarize this content to 100 words Women’s history has played out on TV, as shows turn relevant conversations about class, race, and gender roles into entertainment and opportunities for reflection.The below shows pushed the needle forward, picking up on societal changes and perhaps inspiring women to change their own lives. Their three-dimensional characterizations brought marginalized lives and narratives to the fore — and were also simply fun to watch.Hardly a comprehensive collection of every complicated woman on screen, the below list shows an evolution both in how how on-screen depictions of women have changed, and how opportunities for women creators have led to a varied entertainment landscape. This month, find your new onscreen besties. More Women’s History Month’Julia’ (1968 – 1971)In 1969, Diahann Carroll became the first Black actor nominated for an Emmy for her work in this boundary-breaking show, considered one of the first sitcoms to depict a Black woman lead in a non stereotypical light. As Julia Baker, a Vietnam War widow, nurse and single mother, Carroll led the seminal series about a successful Black woman with agency.’The Mary Tyler Moore Show’ (1970 – 1977)Moore in “The Mary Tyler Moore Show”Bettmann ArchiveMary Tyler Moore takes on the world, starting with a single newsroom, in this trailblazing sitcom about a woman in a male-dominated work environment. Moore’s character, Mary Richards, navigates her career and taboo issues at the time that remain relevant today, such as workplace discrimination and equal pay.’Wonder Woman’ (1975 – 1979)Lynda Carter in costume as “Wonder Woman.”Bettmann ArchiveIn her role as Diana Prince, a.k.a Wonder Woman, Lynda Carter stepped into a red, white, and blue superhero bodysuit to fight evil and advocate for peace. The series did more than bring action to television: It arguably empowered a generation of women and girls to recognize and embrace their strength.’Laverne and Shirley’ (1976 – 1983)Penny Marshall (left), as Laverne De Fazio, and Cindy Williams as Shirley Feeney (right) in “Laverne and Shirley.”Silver Screen Collection / Getty ImagesThis ’70s hit, a spinoff of “Happy Days,” followed the comedic misadventures of two single best friends, Laverne DeFazio (Penny Marshall) and Shirley Feeney (Cindy Williams). The Milwaukee-set series captured infused each episode with messages of friendship and female empowerment, set on a backdrop of working-class life.’227′ (1985 – 1990)Jackée on “227.”Everett CollectionThe residents of a Washington, D.C. apartment building take center stage in this sitcom, focusing predominantly on Black characters. Marla Gibbs’ character, Mary Jenkins, is the no-nonsense yet kind-hearted soul of her family and building. Regina King plays her daughter. The show was cutting-edge for its time, portraying Black women as central figures in their community, and broadening the depiction of Black experiences on TV.’Living Single’ (1993 – 1988)This ’90s classic follows four single Black women living together in New York, navigating love, friendship and the corporate ladder. The show’s leading actors, Queen Latifah, Kim Coles, Kim Fields and Erika Alexander, underscored the dynamism of Black women, showcasing that not all of their experiences or interests were or are the same — even if previous stereotypical pop culture depictions implied otherwise.’Sex and the City’ (1998 – 2004)Kristin Davis, Sarah Jessica Parker, Cynthia Nixon and Kim Cattrall on the set of the “Sex and the City” movie.James Devaney / Getty Images”Sex and The City” is a lasting cultural phenomenon. The series, adapted from Candace Bushnell’s book, immersed viewers into the romantic escapades and big career moments of four vibrant female friends: Carrie Bradshaw (Sarah Jessica Parker), Samantha Jones (Kim Cattrall), Charlotte York (Kristin Davis), and Miranda Hobbes (Cynthia Nixon), all living in New York. Tackling topics like sexuality and promiscuity, the series rewrote the playbook on what was permissible for women to be seen doing on screen. The cast reunited for two spinoff movies and a TV show, “…And Just Like That.”‘The L Word’ (2004 – 2019)Ilene Chaiken’s series “The L Word” is a force of a show about a core group of LGBTQ+ friends and lovers. By falling in and out of love, the show’s six main characters — Jennifer Beals (Bette Porter), Laurel Holloman (Tina Kennard), Leisha Hailey (Alice Pieszecki), Katherine Moennig (Shane McCutcheon), Erin Daniels (Dana Fairbanks), and Pam Grier (Kit Porter) — brought a new depth of lesbian representation to TV.’Ugly Betty’ (2006 – 2010)America Ferrera.Michael Desmond / Getty ImagesThis beloved dramedy features America Ferrera as Betty Suarez, an unapologetically nerdy, career-minded woman of color in her early 20s. When she gets an assistant job at a fashion magazine, Betty feels out of place. The series scrutinized the conventional standards of beauty in the fashion world and beyond. ‘Girls’ (2012 – 2017)”Girls” was HBO’s definitive series about a millennial friend group. The Lena Dunham-created series had characters that were sometimes blind to their privilege — but audience members picked up on it, starting conversations that last to this day. ‘Scandal’ (2012 – 2018)Kerry Washington in “Scandal.”Eric McCandless / Disney Shonda Rhimes and her shows, from “Grey’s Anatomy” to “Scandal” to “How to Get Away With Murder,” have changed the TV landscape, offering up strong women and just as strong plot twists. In “Scandal,” Kerry Washington plays Olivia Pope, the most powerful crisis manager in Washington, D.C. who is at risk of creating a crisis of her own by having an affair with the president.’Veep’ (2012 – 2019)Julia Louis-Dreyfus in “Veep.”HBOThis satirical series imagined a reality that the United States has yet to experience: the life and career of a woman who serves as the vice president of the United States, and later becomes president. Selina Meyer (Julia Louis-Dreyfus) is no hero, however — “Veep” shines in skewering Selina and her hypocrisy. The series received critical acclaim and awards throughout its run, including multiple Emmy Awards and Outstanding Lead Actress for Julia Louis-Dreyfus.’Killing Eve’ (2018—2022) Villanelle (Jodie Comer), a fashion-obsessed assassin, and Eve (Sanda Oh), an MI5 officer, have a complicated relationship, and they can’t get enough of it. For its exploration of sexuality, morality and identity, the series, created by Phoebe Waller-Bridge, raised the bar for female-led narratives.’Abbott Elementary’ (2020 – present)Abbott Elementary” stars Chris Perfetti as Jacob, Quinta Brunson as Janine, Lisa Ann Walter as Melissa, Sheryl Lee Ralph as Barbara, William Stanford Davis as Mr. Johnson, Tyler James Williams as Gregory, and Janelle James as Ava. Matt Sayles / ABC“Abbott Elementary” continues to make waves with its fresh perspective on the public school system. The series has racked up Emmy and critical acclaim, focusing especially on its creator, Quinta Brunson. The series raises questions about the intersections of race, class and education equity.

#Complicated #trailblazing #shows #women #watch #Womens #History #Month

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